Courses

Item # ANTH 100
Subject Anthropology
Units 3

This course is an introduction to the sub-discipline of sociocultural anthropology, which is the study of contemporary human cultures and societies. The course introduces the basic terminology and theoretical perspectives anthropologists use to understand the ways that humans organize themselves and the cultural logic through which they think about the world and their social relations. Course material covers a wide variety of cultural contexts, both familiar and unfamiliar, to help students understand the cultural logic of the beliefs and social practices of others and critically examine the cultural logics and assumptions of their own culture.

Hours

3
Item # ARTHIST 104
Concentration/Area Humanities Concentration
Subject Art History
Units 3
The course explores the relation between the two terms ‘visual’ and ‘culture’ as constructions, examining visual forms of expressions, such as painting, photography, advertisement, comics and digital imagery. The course revolves around some of the following questions: What is the difference between the terms art and visual? What are the diverse forms of the visual? How has the visual impacted us today? How does culture determine visual form? With an emphasis on the determining role of visual culture in the wider culture to which it belongs, it draws on images from both western and non-western worlds to be analyzed and placed in their cultural context.

Hours

3
Item # ARTHIST 105
Concentration/Area Humanities Concentration
Subject Art History
Units 3
The course introduces the students to the major works of art and art movements of the world by analyzing the visual characteristics of works of art and placing them in their historical and cultural context. It covers sculpture, painting, architecture, print, ceramics, and photography from ancient to modern cultures from east and west. The course seeks to provide the beginning art history student with a range of conceptual, visual and verbal skills essential to the description and analysis of visual forms.

Hours

3
Item # BIO 110
Concentration/Area Science and Mathematics Program
Subject Biology
Units 3

This course is an introduction to environmental issues – the interactions of humanity and industrial civilization with the natural environment of Earth. The course draws on scientific, technological, and social perspectives to examine current and future environmental challenges, including the impacts of human actions on natural ecosystems, natural resources, pollution, and climate change.

Hours

3
Item # BIO 115
Concentration/Area Science and Mathematics Program
Subject Biology
Units 3

Everyone knows someone who has been impacted by cancer. By merely surviving, our bodies are primed with the capacity to develop this disease. This course will explore the ‘war on cancer’ in the context of human history, cell biology, and dramatic storytelling. Laboratory exercises will explore the biological basis of this disease. Not open to students who are enrolled in or who have taken and passed IBC 200 with at least a grade of C- or P.

Hours

3
Item # ASTR 120
Concentration/Area Science and Mathematics Program
Units 3

This course will explore how astronomers have been able to discover Earth’s place in the universe, and the structure of the local galaxy and universe. Within this exploration, astronomers have also discovered thousands of other planets, and have begun to map the deepest extents of time and space. From the discovery of distant galaxies and signatures of the origins of the universe, we also have begun to unravel the mysteries of the Big Bang, the formation of the first stars and galaxies, and how the earth arose from billions of years of cosmic evolution. The course will explore the search for exoplanets and the early universe with a mix of in-class exercises, analysis of space-based datasets and observations with telescopes and instruments.

Hours

3
Item # BIO 120
Concentration/Area Science and Mathematics Program
Subject Biology
Units 3

The human body is an amazing product of 3.5 billion years of evolution. From our cells to our organ systems, our bodies are beautifully designed to thrive on planet Earth. In this course, we will explore the structure and function of various human organ systems including the circulatory system, respiratory system, digestive system, reproductive system, and portions of the endocrine system (kidneys and adrenal glands). Along the way, we will discuss challenges faced by each of these organ systems in this modern age that can result in disease such as air pollution, endocrine disrupting chemicals, overuse of antibiotics, chronic stress, and a highly-processed industrial diet. Students will perform various hands-on laboratory activities that will reinforce how their bodies function and how they can live a healthy life. Not open to students who are enrolled in or who have taken and passed BIO 303 with at least a grade of C- or P.

Hours

3
Item # BIO 130
Concentration/Area Science and Mathematics Program
Subject Biology
Units 3

Have you ever wondered about DNA and how slight alterations to the genetic code have produced the amazing variety of life forms that inhabit our planet? This class will explore exciting topics in both genetics and evolutionary biology, some of which include: the genetics of cancer, reproduction and inheritance, epigenetics, GMOs, DNA forensics, antibiotic resistance, evolution of the “fat gene,” and how to build evolutionary trees. Students will explore these topics through lectures, case study work, and hands-on laboratory exercises. Not open to students who are enrolled in or who have taken and passed IBC 200 with at least a grade of C- or P.

Hours

3
Item # BIO 135
Concentration/Area Science and Mathematics Program
Subject Biology
Units 3

This course explores the anatomical form and function of representatives from major animal phyla. Students will first learn about evolutionary processes that have generated the tremendous variety of form and function present in the animal kingdom. They will then learn about different lines of evidence that support the theory of common descent and examine how major lineages within the animal kingdom were created from key morphological innovations. Students will then take a tour of the major animal phyla. Students will explore these topics through lectures and hands-on laboratory activities that include live animal observations, dissections, field trips, and case studies. Not open to students who are enrolled in or who have taken and passed BIO 306 with at least a grade of C- or P.

Hours

3
Item # ANTH 150
Subject Anthropology
Units 3
This course introduces students to biological anthropology and anthropological archaeology – those portions of the discipline concerned with human prehistory and continuing human development. The course examines reconstructions of the human record based on fossil and artifact-based evidence of human biological and cultural change over time. It considers various theories of human biological evolution and the emergence of culture – humanity’s unique ecological niche. The course examines the origins and development of world civilizations, and takes a critical look at theories that try to explain the development of social complexity.

Hours

3
Item # ARTHIST 170
Concentration/Area Humanities Concentration
Subject Art History
Units 3
The course explores architecture as a cultural force and its interaction with the environment, in the context of social, cultural, and political realities. It draws examples from ancient Classical, Renaissance, Islamic, Asian, and Modern architecture comparing form, function, concept, association, and intent. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of architecture and art, design, space, structures, styles, theories and development of architecture.

Hours

3
Item # AMEREXP 200
Concentration/Area Area and Comparative Studies
Subject
Units 3

This multidisciplinary course explores the American experience in its social, political, cultural, and historical dimensions. The course examines major American institutions, including the philosophy and history of the United States Constitution from its founding to present day interpretations; the struggle over individual and group rights; and America’s presence in the world, taking an approach to the American experience that exposes it to many and varied interpretations. The course includes such topics as American musical, film, and literary traditions, contemporary social and economic issues, politics and political history, the immigrant experience, slavery and its aftermath, American isolationism/expansionism, and the question of what is “mainstream” and what is “marginal” to American life. As a result of taking this course, students will develop a critical understanding of the social, political, cultural, and historical dimensions of the diversity of US experiences; perspectives on US institutions and their role in local and global power relations; interpretive skills through close readings of texts across a variety of genres and media; written and oral communication skills.

Hours

3
Item # BIO 205
Concentration/Area Life Sciences Concentration
Subject
Units 3

This course is an introduction to statistics, a field which involves the collection, organization, analysis, interpretation, and presentation of continuous or categorical data. This course is designed for students in the Life Sciences concentration and students interested in medical careers who are not in Life Sciences. This course will focus specifically on biological and chemical examples and datasets.

Hours

3
Item # BIO 222
Concentration/Area Science and Mathematics Program
Subject Biology
Units 3

This course focuses on the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of marine habitats and the organisms occupying those habitats, and provides a survey of the patterns of distribution, diversity, and abundance of species in marine communities, with an emphasis on the dynamic interactions which shape these patterns. The course also includes analysis of human impacts on marine ecosystems.

Hours

3
Item # BIO 301
Concentration/Area Life Sciences Concentration
Subject
Units 3

This course will take an in-depth analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genetics at the level of molecular, cellular, organismal, and population genetics. Data analysis will rely on a quantitative approach. An integrated laboratory project will utilize basic genetic techniques.

Hours

3
Item # BIO 302
Concentration/Area Life Sciences Concentration
Subject
Units 3

Bioinformatics is the use of computer databases and algorithms to analyze biological data. This course will apply bioinformatics to the field of genomics: the study of the protein, mRNA, and DNA sequences that comprise an organism’s genome. Topics will include sequence databases, pairwise and multiple sequence alignments, genome browsers, genome assembly and annotation, molecular evolution, phylogenetic analysis, and population genetics. The computer-based laboratory component will provide students with training in several command-line and web-based bioinformatics tools.

Hours

3
Item # BIO 303
Concentration/Area Life Sciences Concentration
Subject
Units 3

This course will explore the fascinating workings of the human body in both form and function. We will take a tour of the major organ systems and learn about how they work together to maintain homeostasis. This tour will include the respiratory system, circulatory system, digestive system, including energy and metabolism, immune system, urinary system, reproductive system, and finally, how these systems communicate with one another via the endocrine system and nervous system. This course will use a combination of lectures, class discussions, and group activities that involve case studies, physiology experiments, and dissections. This course will be useful for those who are planning on pursuing a career in the health sciences.

Prevents co- or later enrollment in BIO 120.

Hours

3
Item # BIO 304
Concentration/Area Life Sciences Concentration
Subject
Units 3

Theodosius Dobzhansky famously said, “Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution.”  Evolution is genetic change over time, and as genes change, so does the organism.  This course will explore microevolution, which is evolution at the population level, and macroevolution, which is evolution at the species level and higher.  An example microevolutionary question is: Why does a male peacock have such a large tail when it makes him more vulnerable to predation?  An example macroevolutionary question is: Why do some modern humans have gene variants that originated in Neanderthals?

Hours

3
Item # ARTHIST 305
Concentration/Area Humanities Concentration
Subject Art History
Units 3
The course offers a broad view of Modern Asian Art, including painting, photography and print of China, Japan, Tibet, Nepal and India for a selective and meaningful understanding of its visual culture. The focus is on Tradition vs. Modernity with a wide range of art historical issues and discourses. Emphasis will be placed on thematic issues in visual culture such as movement of people, ideas, images, cross-cultural influences, and variations in the structure of political, economic, and social institutions.

Hours

3
Item # BIO 305
Concentration/Area Life Sciences Concentration
Subject
Units 3

This course will enable students to describe cellular contents in terms of membranes, organelles, and intracellular trafficking; recognize amino acids, their modifications, and the implications on protein structure and function; describe cellular biochemistry including basic enzyme kinetics, glycolysis, TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, photosynthesis, fermentation, and alternative pathways; manipulate signaling pathways from extracellular or intracellular stimuli to generate a cellular response; describe how cells divide and die, specifically in terms of protein regulation of these pathways; and apply all these normal cellular processes to neurobiology and its pathology. A laboratory component will practice basic tissue culture techniques by imaging cellular proteins under different signaling conditions.

Hours

3
Item # BIO 310
Concentration/Area Life Sciences Concentration
Subject
Units 3

Have you ever wondered how scientists determine the three-dimensional structure of nucleic acids and proteins? Or what can be gleaned about the function of a macromolecule from its structure? Focusing on nucleic acids and proteins, this course includes an introduction to structural bioinformatics, methods of macromolecular structure determination by diffraction and spectroscopic techniques, and the visualization and representation of biomolecules. Representative biomolecules provide the framework for the discussion of such concepts as motifs, domains, folds, conformation, molecular assembly, dynamics and recognition, as well as for addressing how specific biological questions are answered at the atomic level.

Hours

3
Item # ARTHIST 310
Concentration/Area Humanities Concentration
Subject Art History
Units 3
The course traces the development of architecture, painting, and sculpture of China, Japan, India, and Tibet for a selective understanding of its visual culture from the earliest times to 12th C CE. It is a comparative study of the cross-cultural influences and encounters via the silk and spices routes with a focus on ancient civilizations, philosophy, and religious institutions particularly the traditions of Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism, Buddhism, and Hinduism. The goal is to understand the traditional Arts of Asia by examining the process of artistic and cultural assimilation that occurred along with movement of people, goods, and images between major cultural regions and substantiated in built environment, city planning, painting and sculpture.

Hours

3
Subject Anthropology
Units 3

This course is about the way that Latin American immigration to the US, and often their return back to Latin America, affects the communities, families, racial identities, and even sex lives of both immigrants and the people they leave behind. The course will draw on readings primarily from Anthropologists and Sociologists who see immigration, not as a linear process of arrival and eventual integration, but as a transnational process of the movement of people, money, culture, and politics back and forth across borders in complex ways that affect both the US and Latin America. Thus, while the course will cover the overall historical trends of Latino immigration to the US, changing demographics, the effects of US immigration laws on immigrants and their families, and the overall economic and political trends in Latin America that explain why people migrate, the real focus of the course is on the effects of these overall trends on communities and families in both the US and Latin America as illustrated through ethnographically rich case studies based on participant observation with migrants, return migrants, and members of the sending communities.

Hours

3
Item # ARTHIST 315
Concentration/Area Humanities Concentration
Subject Art History
Units 3
Visual Culture is an emerging field of study, and the course explores the relation between the two terms ‘visual’ and ‘culture’ as constructions by examining visual forms of expression: architecture, sculpture, painting, and photography. It probes into questions on visual perception, visual culture and visual problems. The course also examines generic and particular icons of public culture, such as those found in comics (including Disney characters) and advertisements. Images from both American and non-western world will be analyzed and placed in their cultural, historical and social context. The course will discuss issues of modernity, modernism, urban experience, technology, primitivism, feminism, identity and mass consumerism in visual culture in the context of various movements and theories, such as realism and neo realism, neo-expressionism, surrealism and postmodernism.

Hours

3
Item # ANTH 315
Subject Anthropology
Units 3
Cultural anthropology is the comparative study of society, culture, and human diversity. The discipline focuses on the various ways in which social relations, history, politics, and cultural products, like the media, shape peoples’ everyday lives. This course examines ethnographic studies that document the strategies people use to cope with the demands posed by modern urban environments. It also examines some common social problems encountered in urban contexts, such as those involving the historical origins of urban settings, social class and inequality, urban youth subcultures, migration and economic globalization, and public health.

Hours

3
Item # ANTH 320
Subject Anthropology
Units 3
This course introduces students to the basic histories, social structures, cultures, and current issues facing indigenous peoples in Central and South America. It explores how indigenous communities and identities have been formed, from the conquest and through today, examining a range of processes and events, such as colonialism, integration into the global economy, racism and racial hierarchies, civil wars, indigenous social movements, and migration and exile. It also examines the responses of indigenous peoples to these processes and events, looking specifically at topics such as retreat, revolution, and political activism. The goal of the course is to understand indigenous peoples as products of complex processes through which communities, identities and inequalities are produced, not as social isolates. Same as: INTS 335.

Hours

3
Item # ANTH 325
Subject Anthropology
Units 3

Central America is often known as a region of rich cultural heritage but also carries a legacy of vast inequalities and forms of violent repression and rebellion. The purpose of this course is to understand the cultural, political, and economic factors that have led to this particular situation. We begin by looking at the process of conquest and colonization in shaping new societies and social structures, then explore the socio-economic processes that set the stage for many of the conflicts and problems that Central America faces today, and finally, we explore the current situation in Central America as it relates to changing ideas about gender and the role of women, racism and race mixing, immigration and exile, and forms of violence caused by more than 30 years of civil war and economic upheaval. Same as: INTS 325.

Hours

3
Item # ANTH 330
Subject Anthropology
Units 3
This course engages students in an examination of how indigenous peoples of Oceania have been deeply engaged in global, cultural, political, and economic processes since the time of their earliest encounters with representatives of the West. This class incorporates classic and contemporary studies from anthropology and Pacific history, together with the voices and views of islander writers and artists. Social science perspectives are helpful for understanding natural and cultural environments, cultural history and change, language issues, and current socioeconomic and educational issues the Islands face today. Writers and artists can show how islanders are actively shaping their views of themselves and the larger political-economic processes in which they participate. By combining these two points of view, the class will examine the tensions between cultural traditions and globalization and how we, as outsiders and as islanders, come to know and empathize with the peoples of Oceania. Same as: INTS 380.

Hours

3
Subject Anthropology
Units 3

This course uses ethnographic case studies to understand how sex, gender, and sexuality are socially constructed in different societies around the world and how these social constructions generate different identities, social categories, and relations of power. The course uses analytical tools of Anthropology to understand the cultural logic behind practices and beliefs that are informed by culturally specific sex/gender/sexuality systems; how those cultural logics and practices are related to relations of power between individuals; how they become embedded in institutions of the state that affect the way rights are distributed and often violated; and what happens when they come into contact through various types of transnational movements of people and ideas. The course will also expose students to debates about how we use these understandings of the cultural logics of gendered practices and ideologies in order to address specific examples of gender/sexuality discrimination, gender violence, and international human rights discourse and policies.

Hours

3
Item # BIO 350
Concentration/Area Life Sciences Concentration
Subject
Units 3

Using techniques relevant to ecology and evolutionary biology, this laboratory-intensive course will focus on primary literature research, experimental design, data collection and analysis, and science communication.

Hours

3
Item # ARTHIST 370
Concentration/Area Humanities Concentration
Subject Art History
Units 3
Architecture and Urbanism will explore the history and patterns of urban forms in some major cities of the modern world, as it relates to urbanism, environment and community. The course focuses on Natural and Green Architecture as well as the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Rating System as an emerging movement and requirement in modern architecture that reconnects man to earth through the built environment, which will provide a new framework to approach buildings and structures.

Hours

3
Item # ANTH 380
Subject Anthropology
Units 3
In this course we examine “education” by looking beyond the typical setting of the school. Instead, we will consider education in the context of learning and culture. As scholars in history and anthropology have shown during recent decades, learning can be found in classrooms, families, churches, and public places. Learning can be thought of broadly as the process by which people acquire knowledge, attitudes, values, and skills. We will study the past as a deeply constitutive force in the present. Historians call this approach cultural history, anthropologists call it historical ethnography. Specific topics will include prominent and influential theories of pedagogy and learning, as well as the historical and cultural dynamics of race and ethnicity in learning. Throughout the course, we will keep the long history of education reform in mind – including contemporary initiatives. The course is modeled as an intensive reading and writing seminar in which students will be expected to complete an original research paper testing or applying principles discussed in class. Same as: HIST 380.

Hours

3
Item # ANTH 384
Subject Anthropology
Units 3
The Americas were populated for millennia before European colonization transformed the hemisphere and the lives of its first inhabitants. Descendants of these first inhabitants live in many parts of North America – including Orange County, California. This seminar explores the histories and cultures of select Native American peoples from Canada, Mexico, and the United States during selected eras, from before colonization and into the contemporary period. Through reading current and classic scholarship on Native Americans, along with writing a research essay on a topic of the students’ choosing, students will acquire an understanding of the historical and cultural processes that have defined Native American lives. Same as: HIST 384.

Hours

3
Units 3

This course examines anthropological and sociological perspectives of race and ethnicity. Drawing on studies from many different parts of the world, the course explores the nature of ethnic identity, the cultural construction and social meaning of race, the dynamics of race relations and ethnic stratification, and current theories of ethnic conflict and minority rights. The aim of this course is to develop the theoretical tools for comparing the politics of identity and cultural and racial difference cross-culturally and to be able to think critically about our own common sense understandings of race and ethnic relations. Same as: INTS 385.

Hours

3
Item # ANTH 401
Subject Anthropology
Units 3
This course engages students in a critical examination of contemporary urban experiences with a focus on peoples living in the margins of large, dense urban communities, both inside and outside of North America. The course will address questions surrounding how the articulation of global and local markets affects the expression of traditional and modern identities, how underground or informal economies shape the creation of urban street life, and how children and adults actively pursue meaningful family life in contexts of extreme poverty. Readings will focus on cities in the Pacific basin.

Hours

3